My Old Boothill Campaign Papers

The following pictures show some of the materials that I had created for my gaming group  for when we played the TSR Boot Hill game.  These were drawn and written back in the late 1970’s when I was a teenager.  These are the supplemental material we created for our campaign such as various hand drawn town maps, NPC lists, character record sheets and random events.  Until this year they were all somehow packed away for decades with my old Dungeons and Dragons paperwork and game material.  They show the effort we put into creating and populating other towns that we had placed on the Boot Hill Campaign Map.

In a sense, out little wild west campaign was created in the same way as our home grown Dungeons and Dragons adventures.  The small towns were kind of like a dungeon that needed to be drawn out on graph paper and then populated with various traps and monsters.  We took the large campaign map that came with the game and marked out various other towns.  Each one of us took on the task of drawing out maps big enough to use the cardboard counters that came with the game and populating it with various interesting NPCs.  This allowed us to get out of Promise City and rob banks or chase outlaws in smaller places like Rio Boa, Wild Creek, Bullion City and Justice.  There was much more material we wrote that has since been lost or kept by other players who themselves have long since moved on in their lives.  I’ll never use this stuff again but I thought it might be a lark to post it here.  Back then we had no computers or miniatures or model buildings.  It was really a paper-pencil-dice (& imagination) game in the truest sense.  The little cardboard cutout counters were popular with us and we all drew our own unique colored ones for our player characters on the bare backs of some Avalon Hill game pieces.  We also made wolves, cows, dogs, dead body and old lady counters.   So much fun and nostalgia.

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About westerngames99

Retired Army.
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